The Importance of Being Earnest


PosterĄG Maggie Pan at 12:31:2 12/18/97 from c550-12.svdcc.fju.edu.tw
MentionedĄG

The Importance of
being Earnest
In my opinion, Algernon is a little slender and tall, with his hair parted on the side tidily. On his face there are narrow and occipital eyes which observe and criticize the surrounding around him. Also he is a gentleman who dresses himself up everyday and love to show his knowledge in many aspects. He wants to be adored because of being learned. However, in fact I do not think he is really well-bred but just love to show off . So there are many sentences he said in the act that are meaningless and not connected. For example, first he says, "speaking of the science of life," then he continued to say, " have you got the cucumber sandwiches cut for Lady Bracknell?" It is evident that the former part of the sentence has nothing to do with the later one. Besides, from the conversation between he and Ernest , we can learn that Algy is kind of sly, argumental and boring. He not only kept Jack's cigarette case without informing him but read the inscription inside it. Instead of apologizing for it , he made absurd reasons to explain his behavior. His explanation even has something to do with the development of the modern society. I think that is really amazing! Algy knows very well how to deal with people. For instance, he acts great differently in the face and back of Lady Bracknell. He understands that he still has to keep good relationship with her though he dose not fully agree to what she says and thinks. In the first act, I find it interesting that Jack often repeats one sentence," Oh, that's nonsense, Algy." He thinks that Algy takes nothing seriously and talks anything but nonsense. Nevertheless, the act ends with a single but influential sentence by Algy, " Nobody ever dose." My personal explanation is that Algy means no one is telling the truth and everyone is just talking nonsense like him. It strikes me that maybe Algy is the only one in the story who clears all the mess up.
I take great interest in the character, Gwendolen , too. At the moment I read what she said in the act, I think her behavior is foolish and benighted. The ideal of the adolescent has always been to love someone of the name of Ernest. No wonder when she met Ernest (actually his name is Jack ) , she thought she was destined to love him and consented his proposal soon. She did it out of passion and impulse. It occurred to me that all to often we act just like Gwendolen. Sometimes we are controlled by our own affection unconsciously when making decisions. The example of Gwendolen gives us some warnings ! There is another amazing behavior I wound like to mention about the girl, Gwendolen. It is obvious that Jack (the one she called Ernest) is not her true love. Actually all that she pursuits is the romantic feeling she gets from the process of proposal and fulfillment of her dream of getting married with a man with the name of "Erneat." I would describe she as a young, elegant and beautiful girl who is Alice- in- the - Wonderland about love. She longs for only the romantics. She dose not know what love is and what marriage would be.
My description for Lady Bracknell is a woman in her late- fifties, a sort of short and thin. With salt and pepper hair and narrow but eyes. She looks able with glasses. It is her " instinct" to "examine" everyone thoroughly with her eyes. She is well- off and willing to let people know how wealthy and noble she is. Of course she takes wealth and one's background seriously. We can easily know it from the conversation between she and Jack from Page 265 to 269. She asked many questions to find Jack was qualified for the husband of Gwendolen. Things go smoothly at the beginning , however, when she learned that he was found as a baby by a charitable old man her attitude turn to be unsatisfied and even sarcastic !




Response:



Reply the post:

Your Name ĄG
E-Mail AddĄG
SUBJECT ĄG
Your opinion ĄG

[Local Preview]