My Last Duchess


Poster¡G Daisy Wu at 20:51:21 3/17/98 from d03.cef.org.tw
Mentioned¡G
My Last Duchess 
We can discover that the speaker, the duke of Ferrara, is talking with an emissary from a count. In this poem, the duke displayed the painting, which was worked by Fra Pandolf's to the count's envoy. He also tells the envoy why he was displeased with his first wife and made an undercut commands to present what sort of actions he expected from the count's daughter. All these conducts indicate how the duke showed his possession and power. However, all the things he owned are just nothing. For example, when he said that only he could pull out the curtain, it means that he thought himself was powerful and he owned the duchess. Besides, because the duke expected that the duchess only gave her affection and passion to him, he gave prescription and then all the duchess' smiles stopped together. He thought that he really took possession of the duchess: however, he would never sustain the duchess' affection, for he had killed her and the duchess was lifeless. (Both of these situations are the representative dramatic irony.) 
From this poem I found that the duke was selfish. He couldn't tolerate her wife's attitude toward other persons because he conceived that the duchess was his own possession and the duchess shouldn't be easy to please. In my opinion, it is a terrible thing that you have too much sense of occupation and even try to destroy your beloved persons or articles for the reason that you don't want others to share your beloved things. In addition, we could find that the duke was arrogance. He casually points out one of his other works of art, a bronze rarity of Neptune, to show how powerful he was. And the count's daughter who he planned to marry was also like an object to him. If we observe our society neatly, we can find that even now there are still many people who have the same character with Duke. Maybe everyone should learn how to control your sense of occupation and don't set up your happiness on others' pain. 486200664 Daisy